Radio Interview of Tat Ming Pair

Disclaimer
As consulted with the Commercial Radio of Hong Kong (香港商業電臺 881903.com), the Cantonese to English transcription of the interview does not breach copyright law.

Interviewer: Jessica Tse (謝茜嘉)
Interviewee: Tats Lau (劉以達) and Anthony Wong (黃耀明)
Date: February 13, 2017.

Interviewer: Something has been announced on Anthony’s social media platform. It is said that the concert poster of Tat Ming Pair has been taken down.
Interviewee: That’s right.

Interviewer: Of course you both should share a bit about how the incident transpired.
Interviewee: I have expressed myself in that post (on social media). Perhaps everybody is curious to ask us something juicy. Continue reading “Radio Interview of Tat Ming Pair”

Radio Interview of Alan Leong

Disclaimer
As consulted with the Commercial Radio of Hong Kong (香港商業電臺 881903.com), the Cantonese to English transcription of the interview does not breach copyright law.

Interviewer: Stephen Chan (陳志雲)
Interviewee: Alan Leong, SC (梁家傑)
Date: November 16, 2016.

Interviewer: We want to ask you a practical question. Because they (Sixtus Leung and Yau Wai-ching) are applying for a temporary stay of the verdict. And they are preparing to bring the verdict of their case to Court of Appeal. Can cases from The Court of First Instance be heard at Court of Appeal?
Interviewee: The case can be heard at the Court of Appeal, because it is their right (to be heard).
Continue reading “Radio Interview of Alan Leong”

Radio Interview of Andy Lau

Disclaimer
As consulted with the Commercial Radio of Hong Kong (香港商業電臺 881903.com), the Cantonese to English transcription of the interview does not breach copyright law.

Interviewer: Jessica Tse (謝茜嘉)
Interviewee: Andy Lau (劉德華)

Interviewer: As we observe the music industry, and we are often interviewing singers. For the music producers or music labels, they are often lamenting that it is tough to run the business nowadays. My response to them was that other than music industry, every industry has their difficulties too. Since we like to talk about the past… they were saying how the music industry was like in its glorious past. For you, the previous Four Heavenly Kings (四大天王) days, the time when you were releasing many songs – do you have some advice for everybody? My point of view is that every era has its own challenges. Recalling the past, has Andy Lau encountered some tough time?
Interviewee: Tough time appears in every era. Take my era for example. Since March 21 (year unsure), we were stipulated to release all our own songs. In earlier years people were doing cover songs, so creating own songs was kind of tough. My songs are mostly self-composed. But when the industry requires all ten songs to be newly written songs, we felt the pressure. Continue reading “Radio Interview of Andy Lau”

Radio Interview: Jasper Tsang and Anthony Wong

Disclaimer
As consulted with the Commercial Radio of Hong Kong (香港商業電臺 881903.com), the Cantonese to English transcription of the interview does not breach copyright law.

Interviewer: Jasper Tsang (曾鈺成)
Interviewee: Anthony Wong (黃秋生)

Jasper Tsang’s Radio Show
Interviewer: Since you have many ideas, how about you standing in the legislative election then? You fight for your ideas by yourself.
Interviewee: Previously… Ma Fung-kwok said he was always attending the meetings at Legislative Council (Legco).

Interviewer: That was true; it was just that he wasn’t in the meeting hall.
Interviewee: No wonder somebody was looking for him.

Interviewer: That’s how it was.
Interviewee: I can’t make heads or tails of it though. Continue reading “Radio Interview: Jasper Tsang and Anthony Wong”

Radio Interview of LMF

Youtube Links:
Interview (Part 1)
Interview (Part 2)
Interview (Part 3)

Disclaimer
As consulted with the Commercial Radio of Hong Kong (香港商業電臺 881903.com), the Cantonese to English transcription of the interview does not breach copyright law.

Interviewer: Jessica Tse
Interviewees: LMF members
梁永傑(Kit,阿傑)
李健宏(Kevin)
麥文威(Jimmy,老占)
陳廣仁(MC Yan,阿仁)
陳匡榮(Davy,大飛)
陳偉雄(Phat,阿肥)
梁偉庭(Prodip,阿庭)
Date: December 2, 2009

Interviewer: Welcome to the show, what a sturdy band.
Interviewee: Yo!

Interviewer: Our colleagues are very excited.
Interviewee: Phew. (Meow) (Yeah)

Interviewer: What a scratch voice. Okay, welcome LMF to Hit Hot Music. Let’s check out who are with us today. Say your name one by one; LMF members at the radio show are…
Interviewee: From the left? I’m Kit; I’m Kevin; I’m Jimmy; I’m MC Yan; I’m Davy; I’m Phat; I’m Prodip.

Interviewer: Obviously there are seven of you, although on the poster there are nine of you. Many fans said they are happy because LMF is reuniting for a show. But they thought there used to be 12 members in LMF. Do you guys wanna answer this question? Speak freely; no precedence needed.
Interviewee: 12-member LMF was a long time ago. In 2003 there were only ten of us.

Interviewer: Back then you had Sam Lee with you?
Interviewee: Yup. But Sam has been our mysterious guest all the time.
Continue reading “Radio Interview of LMF”

Interview of John Tsang

Disclaimer
As consulted with the Commercial Radio of Hong Kong (香港商業電臺 881903.com), the Cantonese to English transcription of the interview does not breach copyright law.

Interviewers: Loh Fai (transliterated), and Ho Chui Ping
Interviewee: John Tsang Chun-wah (曾俊華), Financial Secretary of Hong Kong
Date: March 2, 2013

Interviewer: Good morning. (Good morning). As May is not feeling well today, we have Ho Chui Ping (also hosting) today. Of course, with us today in the studio today is John Tsang, Financial Secretary of Hong Kong. Good morning, Mr Secretary. (Good morning, Mr Secretary.)
Interviewee: Good morning.

Interviewer: Since the budget has been announced recently, and everybody has been discussing about it, including its policies. And recent surveys revealed that… (split into half?) yup, half of the respondents reported satisfaction, while the half are unhappy with the budget. Mr Secretary, how do you respond to feedback from all walks of life?
Interviewee: Feedback from all walks of life comes from various angles. And the angles are different from one another. But for me it is more or less as expected. Speaking of the budget, you have to observe in different industry to see its influence. Before finalising the draft, we worked very hard together with our colleagues to work on this budget. So that we can strike a balance. If the feedback has been one-third each from three groups of respondents, that is in some way a sort of balance.

Interviewer: (Laughing) Do you feel disappointed if the feedback reflects that it has been criticised for being not innovative, that it scores poorly, or that the financial give-outs are insufficient?
Interviewee: Not really. When we were preparing the budget, innovation is not our first priority. The first priority of ours has to be observing the current economic situation and our financial status. And suggestions raised by Hongkongers, how can we make good use of our resources to cater to their needs? How do we help the needy group so that our society can move forward? This is our first priority. It doesn’t matter if (the method) is old. Being innovative is not our prioritised consideration.
Continue reading “Interview of John Tsang”

Radio Interview of Wong Ka Kui

Singing of Old Dancing Medley (昔日舞曲)

Interviewer: I remember when you guys were releasing this album, I was a new staff just joining the radio. That was the time when band culture was so popular.
Interviewee: Uh-huh.

Interviewer: Some said the image of your band is that of an underground band coming through the surface. But what is underground band?
Interviewee: As a matter of fact, all this while I do not acknowledge ours as an underground band.

Interviewer: You don’t see it that way.
Interviewee: It is just that if that is how people look at Beyond, I can’t help it. Not that I purposely want to debate whether we are an underground band or not.

Interviewer: Why do you say Beyond isn’t (an underground band)? Or you wanna tell us what an underground band is?
Interviewee: My viewpoint of underground is not their viewpoint of underground. Continue reading “Radio Interview of Wong Ka Kui”

Interview of Prof Joseph Sung – Hong Kong SARS Epidemic Ten Years On

Disclaimer
As consulted with the Commercial Radio of Hong Kong (香港商業電臺 881903.com), the Cantonese to English transcription of the interview does not breach copyright law.

Interviewers: May Chan, Loh Fai (transliterated)
Interviewee: Dr Joseph Sung (沈祖堯), vice-chancellor of Chinese University of Hong Kong
Date: March 9, 2013

Interviewer: Good morning. (Good morning) Mr Loh, things changed a lot in ten years. It has been ten years since the outbreak of SARS epidemic. And for Hongkongers, the ten-year mark means differently to them. I remember ten years back we were interviewing Dr Sung, then serving at CUHK Department of Medicine & Therapeutics. When SARS broke out at the 8th floor of Prince of Wales Hospital, and we interviewed Dr Sung. And about same time ten years later, we are again interviewing him. But he is of different status today.

Interviewer: Today Dr Sung is the vice-chancellor of CUHK. Good morning, vice-chancellor. (Good morning, vice-chancellor)
Interviewee: Good morning to both of you.

Interviewer: Prof, on what matters do you feel very deeply, when looking back at SARS epidemic ten years ago?
Interviewee: Recalling ten years back, it was as if I had had a dream. Within such a short period of time, a large number of individuals fell ill, many among them were our own friends and colleagues. And there were medical staff members who died in the course of performing their duty. I saw Hong Kong society suffered from a severe setback. Looking back right now, it is as if something happened just yesterday.

Interviewer: Do you still recall the incident in these ten years? Even if you are not yourself recalling the matter, other individuals and media members would have mentioned it to you.
Interviewee: Yup. The matter is still much talked about among the public. And I myself still keep in touch with the patients back then, and some of them have become my friends. Some of our students fell ill during the outbreak, and some of them are now working as doctors or even consultants. Some of them would say:“Oh ya, back then I was lying on the hospital bed.” People still recall of those memories.
Continue reading “Interview of Prof Joseph Sung – Hong Kong SARS Epidemic Ten Years On”